Friday, September 21

DropSynth is a new method for researchers to synthesize segments of DNA, which researchers use to study protein production, at a much lower cost. (Daily Bruin file photo)

UCLA researchers devise efficient, low-cost method for gene synthesis

UCLA researchers have developed a new method of making genes that is about 100-times cheaper than current methods. Researchers in the department of chemistry and biochemistry and the Molecular Biology Institute created a new technique called DropSynth. Read more...

Photo: DropSynth is a new method for researchers to synthesize segments of DNA, which researchers use to study protein production, at a much lower cost. (Daily Bruin file photo)

DropSynth is a new method for researchers to synthesize segments of DNA, which researchers use to study protein production, at a much lower cost. (Daily Bruin file photo)

UCLA researchers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo sampled the blood of Ebola survivors who had been infected 40 years ago and found they still had immunity against the disease. (Courtesy of UCLA-DRC Health Research and Training Program)

UCLA research team finds that Ebola survivors retain immunity

UCLA researchers have discovered that Ebola survivors retain immunity to the virus even 40 years after contracting the disease. In a study published in December, UCLA researchers led by Anne Rimoin, associate professor of epidemiology, demonstrated that survivors of the 1976 Ebola outbreak in Central Africa still have antibodies against the Ebola virus. Read more...

Photo: UCLA researchers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo sampled the blood of Ebola survivors who had been infected 40 years ago and found they still had immunity against the disease. (Courtesy of UCLA-DRC Health Research and Training Program)

UCLA researchers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo sampled the blood of Ebola survivors who had been infected 40 years ago and found they still had immunity against the disease. (Courtesy of UCLA-DRC Health Research and Training Program)


UCLA researchers have found the protein FHOD1 actually increases the assembly rates of actin, which is a protein involved in muscle contraction and cell connectivity. (Courtesy of Aanand Patel)

UCLA researchers discover novel role for protein involved in muscles

UCLA researchers have found a new role for a protein involved in muscle function. In a study published Nov. 10, researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry discovered a new role for the human protein FHOD1 in accelerating the assembly of actin, one of the main proteins in the structure of muscles. Read more...

Photo: UCLA researchers have found the protein FHOD1 actually increases the assembly rates of actin, which is a protein involved in muscle contraction and cell connectivity. (Courtesy of Aanand Patel)

UCLA researchers have found the protein FHOD1 actually increases the assembly rates of actin, which is a protein involved in muscle contraction and cell connectivity. (Courtesy of Aanand Patel)

William Happer, a visiting physics professor emeritus from Princeton University, gave a talk Tuesday contending against climate change hysteria to students and faculty in the chemistry and biochemistry department. (Ken Shin/Daily Bruin staff)

Visiting professor gives seminar on benefits of carbon dioxide

A visiting physics professor said he thinks rising carbon dioxide levels have contributed little to climate change at a talk Monday. William Happer, a professor emeritus in physics at Princeton University, gave a seminar called “Some Thoughts on Climate” to more than 90 chemistry graduate students and faculty in Young Hall. Read more...

Photo: William Happer, a visiting physics professor emeritus from Princeton University, gave a talk Tuesday contending against climate change hysteria to students and faculty in the chemistry and biochemistry department. (Ken Shin/Daily Bruin staff)

William Happer, a visiting physics professor emeritus from Princeton University, gave a talk Tuesday contending against climate change hysteria to students and faculty in the chemistry and biochemistry department. (Ken Shin/Daily Bruin staff)

Emily Mankin, a postdoctoral scholar in neuroscience, said she hopes the electrical therapy can help treat disorders such as Alzheimer's disease in the future. (MacKenzie Coffman/Daily Bruin)

Researchers study how electric stimulation can improve memory

UCLA researchers found that electrically stimulating a certain part of the brain may improve an individual’s ability to create and recall memories. In a study published in October, researchers from UCLA, along with those from the California Institute of Technology, electrically stimulated a specific brain region of epilepsy patients while the patients learned new faces. Read more...

Photo: Emily Mankin, a postdoctoral scholar in neuroscience, said she hopes the electrical therapy can help treat disorders such as Alzheimer's disease in the future. (MacKenzie Coffman/Daily Bruin)

Emily Mankin, a postdoctoral scholar in neuroscience, said she hopes the electrical therapy can help treat disorders such as Alzheimer's disease in the future. (MacKenzie Coffman/Daily Bruin)