Friday, December 14

In DONTNOD Entertainment's hit game "Life is Strange," players can choose to instigate a romantic relationship between the two main characters Chloe and Max. Columnist Evan Charfauros argues the game utilizes romance to increase character investment. (Creative Commons photo by MrRiddell via Flickr)

Gamer’s Guide: Video game romance, although inorganic, amplifies play experience

Games have always been a huge part of the entertainment industry, but what makes them entertaining? Game makers expend significant effort making design decisions people often don’t think about when they’re playing each game. Read more...

Photo: In DONTNOD Entertainment's hit game "Life is Strange," players can choose to instigate a romantic relationship between the two main characters Chloe and Max. Columnist Evan Charfauros argues the game utilizes romance to increase character investment. (Creative Commons photo by MrRiddell via Flickr)

In DONTNOD Entertainment's hit game "Life is Strange," players can choose to instigate a romantic relationship between the two main characters Chloe and Max. Columnist Evan Charfauros argues the game utilizes romance to increase character investment. (Creative Commons photo by MrRiddell via Flickr)


(Courtesy of Hopper Stone)

Movie review: ‘Game Night’

A movie is bound to be entertaining if its main characters play “Dance Dance Revolution” at their wedding ceremony. Directors John Francis Daley and Jonathan Goldstein’s latest action-comedy “Game Night” follows a group of friends who find themselves unwittingly involved in the world of organized crime during a weekly game-night gathering. Read more...

Photo: (Courtesy of Hopper Stone)

(Courtesy of Hopper Stone)



Joey Meurer, a third-year mechanical engineering student, Sam Celentano, a third-year physics student, and Ryan Poon, a third-year mechanical engineering student (left to right) worked with UCLA's chapter of the 3-D Printing For Everyone club to design 3D-printed ukuleles, which it plans to donate to underprivileged children. (Amy Dixon/Assistant Photo editor)

Students use 3-D printing to bring music to underprivileged children

Updated Feb. 12 at 7:43 p.m. A group of UCLA students will use 3-D printed instruments to teach elementary school children about the intersection of art and science. Read more...

Photo: Joey Meurer, a third-year mechanical engineering student, Sam Celentano, a third-year physics student, and Ryan Poon, a third-year mechanical engineering student (left to right) worked with UCLA's chapter of the 3-D Printing For Everyone club to design 3D-printed ukuleles, which it plans to donate to underprivileged children. (Amy Dixon/Assistant Photo editor)

Joey Meurer, a third-year mechanical engineering student, Sam Celentano, a third-year physics student, and Ryan Poon, a third-year mechanical engineering student (left to right) worked with UCLA's chapter of the 3-D Printing For Everyone club to design 3D-printed ukuleles, which it plans to donate to underprivileged children. (Amy Dixon/Assistant Photo editor)