Sunday, December 8

English professor Elizabeth DeLoughrey will discuss her book "Allegories of the Anthropocene” in Kaplan Hall on Nov. 21. The book highlights allegories as a tool to comprehend the enormity of the climate change crisis by decreasing the scale in consideration. The book aims to unravel post-colonial issues through the lens of art. (Kanishka Mehra/Assistant Photo editor)
English professor Elizabeth DeLoughrey will discuss her book "Allegories of the Anthropocene” in Kaplan Hall on Nov. 21. The book highlights allegories as a tool to comprehend the enormity of the climate change crisis by decreasing the scale in consideration. The book aims to unravel post-colonial issues through the lens of art. (Kanishka Mehra/Assistant Photo editor)

A group of students brought their production of “Camp Song” from a classroom floor to Macgowan Hall. The musical, which will run through Nov. 2, follows a group of friends who travel back to their childhood summer camp to spread the ashes of a friend who recently died of cancer. (Ashley Kenney/Daily Bruin)
A group of students brought their production of “Camp Song” from a classroom floor to Macgowan Hall. The musical, which will run through Nov. 2, follows a group of friends who travel back to their childhood summer camp to spread the ashes of a friend who recently died of cancer. (Ashley Kenney/Daily Bruin)

The Fowler Museum’s exhibit “Through Positive Eyes” features live story telling and art done by people who are HIV-positive. David Gere, a professor in the World Arts and Cultures department, said giving the HIV-positive people the power to create their own art makes it more meaningful, as they can project their own experiences into their work rather than relying on others. (Kanishka Mehra/Assistant Photo editor)
The Fowler Museum’s exhibit “Through Positive Eyes” features live story telling and art done by people who are HIV-positive. David Gere, a professor in the World Arts and Cultures department, said giving the HIV-positive people the power to create their own art makes it more meaningful, as they can project their own experiences into their work rather than relying on others. (Kanishka Mehra/Assistant Photo editor)

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8.19.a&e.web.png

Lecturer in UCLA Writing Programs Susannah Rodriguez Drissi recently released her book “The Latin Poet’s Guide to the Cosmos,” combining different Romance languages to create a hybrid form of poetry. (Kanishka Mehra/Assistant Photo editor)
Lecturer in UCLA Writing Programs Susannah Rodriguez Drissi recently released her book “The Latin Poet’s Guide to the Cosmos,” combining different Romance languages to create a hybrid form of poetry. (Kanishka Mehra/Assistant Photo editor)

(Daily Bruin file photo)
(Daily Bruin file photo)

(Graphic reporting by Deirdre Klena/Daily Bruin, Graphic by Qirui Wu/Daily Bruin)
(Graphic reporting by Deirdre Klena/Daily Bruin, Graphic by Qirui Wu/Daily Bruin)


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