Thursday, December 5

In a yearlong study, UCLA researchers found ocean farming could alleviate a large portion of global hunger, promote biological diversity and minimize the impact of carbon emissions from land farming. (Nicole Anisgard Parra/Illustrations director)

Study says aquaculture may be viable source of food, if done in the right areas

Ocean farming may provide a solution for global hunger and climate change, UCLA researchers found. A yearlong study published in the journal Marine Policy by researchers with the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at UCLA found ocean farming could alleviate a large portion of global hunger, promote biological diversity and minimize the impact of carbon emissions from land farming. Read more...

In a yearlong study, UCLA researchers found ocean farming could alleviate a large portion of global hunger, promote biological diversity and minimize the impact of carbon emissions from land farming. (Nicole Anisgard Parra/Illustrations director)

Achuta Kadambi, an assistant electrical and computer engineering professor, received a National Science Foundation award for his research. If successful, his research could improve the technology used in search and rescue missions. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)
Achuta Kadambi, an assistant electrical and computer engineering professor, received a National Science Foundation award for his research. If successful, his research could improve the technology used in search and rescue missions. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)

(Clara Vamvulescu/Daily Bruin)

New method in testing drug effectiveness shows promise in treating rare cancers

UCLA researchers developed a new method of testing the efficiency of different cancer treatments by growing tumors derived from patients’ cancer cells in labs. A team of undergraduates, graduate students and postdoctoral faculty in the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center published a paper showing the technique was effective in determining the right treatments for patients with rare forms of cancer in Communications Biology, a Nature Research journal, Feb. Read more...

(Clara Vamvulescu/Daily Bruin)