Friday, July 19

Alumna Lava Thomas' art piece, “Freedom Song No. 1,” is featured in the "Pretty Big Things" exhibition. It is made up of tambourines of different sizes covered with colored suede. (Emily Ng/Daily Bruin)

Exhibit explores optimism, beauty amid political climate

Brenda Williams canceled her art exhibition emphasizing optimism when she realized Donald Trump was on his way to winning the 2016 election. Williams, the assistant to the chair of UCLA’s design media arts department, said the show’s cancellation allowed the Walter Maciel Gallery to instead show pieces more pertinent to the election, like portraits of immigrants. Read more...

Photo: Alumna Lava Thomas' art piece, “Freedom Song No. 1,” is featured in the "Pretty Big Things" exhibition. It is made up of tambourines of different sizes covered with colored suede. (Emily Ng/Daily Bruin)

Alumna Lava Thomas' art piece, “Freedom Song No. 1,” is featured in the "Pretty Big Things" exhibition. It is made up of tambourines of different sizes covered with colored suede. (Emily Ng/Daily Bruin)

Jeff LeBeau, Robert Lesser and alumna Shelby Lauren Barry star in “Steambath,” a comedic play imagining purgatory as a steam bath and God as a Puerto Rican attendant. Although much of the humor may be considered offensive, Barry said she hopes presenting the play unaltered from it’s original production will encourage discourse about the topics.
(Courtesy of Ron Sossi)

Production of ‘Steambath,’ raunchy ’70s humor intact, comes to the Odyssey

Purgatory is a steam bath and God is a Puerto Rican attendant in Bruce Jay Friedman’s upcoming play. “Steambath,” which premieres Saturday at the Odyssey Theatre, follows the life and afterlife of protagonist Tandy as he grapples with his own mortality. Read more...

Photo: Jeff LeBeau, Robert Lesser and alumna Shelby Lauren Barry star in “Steambath,” a comedic play imagining purgatory as a steam bath and God as a Puerto Rican attendant. Although much of the humor may be considered offensive, Barry said she hopes presenting the play unaltered from it’s original production will encourage discourse about the topics. (Courtesy of Ron Sossi)

Jeff LeBeau, Robert Lesser and alumna Shelby Lauren Barry star in “Steambath,” a comedic play imagining purgatory as a steam bath and God as a Puerto Rican attendant. Although much of the humor may be considered offensive, Barry said she hopes presenting the play unaltered from it’s original production will encourage discourse about the topics.
(Courtesy of Ron Sossi)



(Courtesy of Netflix)

Movie review: ‘Sierra Burgess is a Loser’ continues Netflix’s rom-com winning streak

Netflix continues its summer-long bid for the title of rom-com kingpin with “Sierra Burgess is a Loser.” After “Set it Up” was met with wide critical acclaim and “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before” garnered a mass following within mere hours, it is nearly impossible for “Sierra Burgess is a Loser” to dodge comparison to the precursory films credited with the revival of the rom-com genre. Read more...

Photo: (Courtesy of Netflix)

(Courtesy of Netflix)

Alumna Margaret Martin founded Harmony Project, which offers music lessons to at-risk youth in Los Angeles. Martin said the project has grown from only 36 students to 6,000, and has expanded beyond the city to other school districts such as Riverside. 
(Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)

Alumna’s Harmony Project prepares to expand nationwide after repeated successes

A group of gang members walking through a Hollywood farmers market 21 years ago stopped to listen to a young boy playing the violin. The five-year-old violinist was the son of Margaret Martin, UCLA alumna and the founder of the Harmony Project. Read more...

Photo: Alumna Margaret Martin founded Harmony Project, which offers music lessons to at-risk youth in Los Angeles. Martin said the project has grown from only 36 students to 6,000, and has expanded beyond the city to other school districts such as Riverside. (Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)

Alumna Margaret Martin founded Harmony Project, which offers music lessons to at-risk youth in Los Angeles. Martin said the project has grown from only 36 students to 6,000, and has expanded beyond the city to other school districts such as Riverside. 
(Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)