Sunday, September 23

UCLA inducts eight former Bruins to Athletic Hall of Fame


(Juliette Le Saint/Daily Bruin)

(Juliette Le Saint/Daily Bruin)


UCLA Athletics inducted eight former Bruins into its Athletic Hall of Fame on June 6. The 2018 Hall of Fame class garnered a total of 12 NCAA championships earned either as players or coaches. The eight will be officially inducted on Oct. 5, and then honored at the UCLA-Washington football game the following day.

Nikki Blue (Women’s basketball, 2002-06)

Nikki Blue – a two-time honorable mention All-American – finished her career at UCLA ranked fifth all-time in scoring, second in assists, third in steals and fourth in 3-pointers made.

The guard led the Bruins to two NCAA tournament appearances and their first and only conference tournament championship in 2006. She became the fifth player in Pac-10 history to be named to the all-conference team in four consecutive years.

Blue was selected in the second round of the 2006 WNBA Draft by the Washington Mystics. After playing professionally for five years, Blue served as an assistant coach at UNLV, CSU Bakersfield and currently at Grand Canyon.

Kevin Chappell (Men’s golf, 2005-08)

Kevin Chappell lifted UCLA to a one-stroke victory at the 2008 NCAA championships with a par on the final hole. Chappell also won the NCAA individual title that year, earning Pac-10 Golfer of the Year and the Jack Nicklaus Award for National Collegiate Player of the Year.

The three-time All-American won a total of six titles during his collegiate career, winning three in his senior year. Chappell also broke the UCLA single-season scoring record in 2008. His highest world rank was 23rd, and he is currently ranked 58th.

After graduating, Chappell played professionally and has accumulated over $15 million in earnings. He tied for third at the U.S. Open in 2011 and won the Valero Texas Open in 2017. Chappell has been playing in all four majors over the past few years.

Lynn “Buck” Compton (Baseball, 1940-42, 1946; Football, 1940-42)

Lynn “Buck” Compton was a decorated dual-sport athlete – a catcher for baseballand both a defensive and offensive lineman for football.

Compton earned all-conference honors for baseball, batting over .300 during his career. He was also part of the first UCLA football squad to bring home a conference championship, play in the Rose Bowl game and defeat crosstown rival USC.

After serving in the Army for three years during World War II, Compton returned to Westwood to play one final season of baseball in 1946. He turned down a minor league offer after graduating to focus on a career in law.

Compton became an attorney for the City of Los Angeles, and was eventually appointed to the California Courts of Appeal where he served as a judge.

Larry Farmer (Men’s Basketball, 1971-73)

Larry Farmer played under coach John Wooden and was a member of three championship teams during the Bruins’ stretch of seven consecutive national titles.

The 6-foot-5-inch forward averaged 9.4 points and 4.8 rebounds during his collegiate career. In his three seasons, UCLA put together an 89-1 overall record – the best winning percentage over a three-year span in NCAA history.

Farmer was picked in 1973 by both the Cleveland Cavaliers in the NBA Draft and the Denver Nuggets by the ABA Draft, but turned down both offers to pursue coaching instead. He became UCLA’s head coach in 1981, and led the Bruins to a 61-23 record and a Pac-10 title during a three-year stretch.

Amanda Freed (Softball, 1999-2002)

Amanda Freed ended her career as one of UCLA’s all-time top players in multiple statistical categories, as both a pitcher and a hitter. The three-time All-American finished sixth in strikeouts, sixth in shutouts, second in at-bats and third in runs scored.

In her four years as a Bruin, UCLA went to the Women’s College World Series every season and captured the 1999 championship in Freed’s freshman year.

After becoming the all-time winningest UCLA pitcher with 97 wins, Freed went on to play for U.S. national team. She was an alternate in the 2000 Olympic Games and helped Team USA win gold at the 2004 Olympic Games.

Jenny Johnson Jordan (Women’s volleyball, 1991-95)

Jenny Johnson Jordan ranks No. 22 in all-time kills at UCLA with 1,212, and No. 9 in digs, with 1,214. The outside hitter helped the Bruins win a national championship her freshman year, as well as attain two runner-up finishes her sophomore and senior years.

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Former Bruin indoor volleyball player and current UCLA beach volleyball assistant coach Jenny Johnson Jordan celebrates with the Bruins after bringing home the program's first-ever national championship in May. (Aubrey Yeo/Daily Bruin senior staff)

After graduating, Jordan switched to beach volleyball after playing indoors, and placed fifth at the 2000 Olympic Games alongside former UCLA outside hitter Annett (Buckner) Davis.

The two-time All-American is currently an assistant coach for UCLA beach volleyball and led the Bruins to its first Pac-12 and national titles last season.

Eric Lindroth (Men’s water polo, 1969-72)

As a Bruin, center Eric Lindroth led the team to its first-ever NCAA championship his freshman year. UCLA posted a 73-4 overall record during Lindroth’s four years and won the national title again in 1971 and 1972.

Lindroth was a two-time All-American and played on the U.S. national team from 1970 to 1983. He led Team USA to a bronze medal finish at the 1972 Olympic Games.

Lindroth was also a member of the FINA Cup championship team in 1983, and played over 100 international games. He was inducted into the USA Water Polo Hall of Fame in 1988.

Stella Sampras Webster (Women’s tennis, 1988-91)

Stella Sampras Webster led the Bruins to four straight top-three finishes at the NCAA championships and captured the NCAA doubles title with Allyson Cooper in 1988. Sampras Webster is the sister of Pete Sampras – a 14-time Grand Slam champion.

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UCLA women's tennis coach Stella Sampras Webster led the Bruins to an Elite Eight appearance for the first time in three years. In her 22 years of coaching, Sampras Webster has led UCLA to an NCAA appearance every single year. (Daily Bruin file photo)

The four-year All-American took over the coaching job in 1997. In her 22 years of coaching, Sampras Webster has led the Bruins to an NCAA appearance all 22 seasons. Her 420-158 overall record makes her the winningest women’s tennis coach in program history.

The Bruins brought home national championships under Sampras Webster in 2008 and 2014 – the program’s only NCAA titles. Sampras Webster was inducted into the Southern California Tennis Association Hall of Fame last year.

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