This post was updated at 2:07 p.m.

The original version of this article contained an error and has been changed. See the bottom of the article for more information.

Congressional candidate Theo Milonopoulos filed a lawsuit Sunday against the University of California and UCLA for allegedly sponsoring a political campaign event by authorizing funding for a student group.

In a press release announcing the lawsuit, independent write-in candidate Milonopoulos accused UCLA of authorizing Progressive Leaders for Democratic Action, a student-run organization, to financially sponsor a campaign event last week called “PDLA Presents Progressive Congressional Candidate: Marianne Williamson” at UCLA.

Progressive Leaders for Democratic Action, which was founded in April, announced on May 7 that it would endorse Williamson in the congressional race.

Hugh Tra, a fourth-year history student and the president of Progressive Leaders of Democratic Action at UCLA, said the purpose of the event was to allow the community to meet and hear from candidates the organization endorsed. Tra said the organization invited several of the 18 candidates running for office to the event, but only Williamson attended, Tra said.

Campaign literature for Williamson and for other candidates endorsed by the organization was also distributed at the event, he added.

Tra said all funding for the forum came out of his own pocket because the group could not obtain funding from the university in time for the event. UCLA did not authorize the group to financially sponsor the forum, Tra added.

According to the Undergraduate Students Council Association’s budget report on Monday, no USAC contingency funds were given to the group.

UCLA spokesman Ricardo Vazquez said in an email statement Monday that UCLA did not provide funding to the Progressive Leaders for Democratic Action. The group has also not applied for any funding from the university, Vasquez said.

UCLA does not take into consideration a group’s political affiliations when judging funding applications, Vazquez added.

Under the federal Internal Revenue Code, charitable organizations, including non-profit, public higher education institutions such as UCLA, are prohibited from any participation in political campaigns.

UCLA spokesman Ricardo Vazquez said in an email statement Monday that UCLA has not provided funding to the Progressive Leaders for Democratic Action. The group has also not applied for any funding from the university, Vasquez said.

UCLA does not take into consideration a group’s political affiliations when judging funding applications, Vazquez added.

If the court finds that UCLA violated the federal code, the school could face tax penalties and risk losing its status as a tax-exempt institution of higher education.

At the event last Thursday, Williamson spoke about her political views and allegedly gave out campaign paraphernalia, Milonopoulos said.

Milonopoulos said he thinks refreshments at the event were donated by Williamson’s supporters. On May 8, Progressive Leaders for Democratic Action advertised for paid canvassers to campaign for Williamson on the group’s Facebook page, offering $14 an hour for five-hour weekday and weekend shifts. Williamson’s campaign also sponsored three days of advertising for the event in the Daily Bruin, Milonopoulos said.

Milonopoulos also filed a complaint with the Federal Elections Commission’s Office of General Counsel against the Williamson campaign on Friday for allegedly violating federal election and campaign finance laws.

UCLA officials, Progressive Leaders for Democratic Action, Cicero and Williamson’s campaign could not be reached for comment by press time.

Compiled by Emily Liu, Bruin contributor.

Correction: USAC did not give any funds to Progressive Leaders for Democratic Action.